Recommended Readings...

1 Interview with Leroy Clarke by Tony Hall, August 1985, PanCaribbean.com

Leroy's studio/home in the forests of Mt. Aripo, Trinidad
TONY:
When you say 'their own interpretations' in terms of how you want them to interpret it you want them to interpret it that way.
LEROY:
Yes that is my beginning point or my point of departure. I want people to understand exactly what I'm putting down there. I don't want them to start with the idea that this is an abstract sort of thing. This is not a abstract, these images are put down there with precise meanings it is an epic and I am at the end of this epic and I should know exactly what they mean and I want people to understand them from that context. I don't want people to feel that the red is there because I like red. I am not a butterfly or some other insect or a bee. I know exactly why I put red and the combination of red with yellow or what have you, these are definite forms. I'm thinking of years from now when we have understood our own symbolism and we have a kind of dictionary of it all in a living sense, a living dictionary of it, it would be very easy for us to look at our arts, whether it be dancing or music and identify exactly what they are saying so I don't want anybody to be mistaking what I am doing. What I'm saying right now is we are building, creating or forming a language. I am very serious about that. Read More...

http://www.pancaribbean.com/banyan/leroy.htm


2 LeRoy Clarke: Profile of LeRory Clarke by Campbells of London

Leroy Clarke is one of the most prolific artists of Trinidad and Tobago. He was named ‘Master Artist’ by the National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago.  Known for his complex and layered grand-scale paintings, Clarke's images are rife with symbolism and social allegory. Read More...

http://campbellsoflondon.co.uk


3 LeROY CLARKE—A KNOWN MYSTERY tntreview.com - February 2nd, 2009 - by Duff W. Mitchell

While Discipline, Tolerance and Production were the adopted watchwords of the nation , the motto for nationhood fell short of the mark and could today find reference in our work ethic: ‘Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve’.  A pixilated proverb comes to mind: ‘If aspirations were equine, eleemosynary would afford themselves transportation’. That is to say: If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.

Not only did our motto fall short of the mark, it became entrenched through one laureate when he sang “In order to achieve, we going to aspire and we bong to be a success.” (Sparrow).

If only we could amend this to read “In order to achieve, aspire then perspire and we bong to be a success.” Read More...

http://www.tntreview.com/


4 You LeRoy Clarke Interviewed by Maya Trotz for Jouvay.com. February, 2004

Meeting and interviewing Leroy Clarke during carnival season in Trinidad was not just the icing on the cake, but the cake and the meal itself. He is a painter extraordinaire whose intricate and deep pieces of art fill galleries, homes and treasured places throughout the world. He's Trinidad's master artist who people make documentaries of, who authors make books of, who Ministers turn to for advice on culture and who youths flock to for advice on living. He took time out to explain the meaning and importance of the Afro-centricity of his art, to discuss the "dread" direction in which Trinidad carnival is heading and even discuss the nature of Caribbean men's polygamist behavior. Read More... Photo Slide Show...

http://www.jouvay.com/.